The Most Difficult Origami, Ranked

Choose the Origami you think is the most difficult!

Author: Gregor Krambs
Updated on May 24, 2024 06:30
Folding paper might sound simple, but the art of Origami pushes this basic craft to its limits. For enthusiasts, tackling the most difficult designs can be both a rewarding challenge and a source of frequent frustration. By ranking these tricky creations, we offer a pathway for both beginners and seasoned folders to gauge the complexity and finesse required for these artistic endeavors. This live ranking serves as a dynamic guide that evolves with user input, reflecting current opinions on the difficulty of various Origami projects. It not only aids folders in setting realistic challenges for themselves but also highlights the achievements within the Origami community. Each vote helps reshape the rankings, ensuring they stay relevant and accurate for all.

What Is the Most Difficult Origami?

  1. 1
    144
    votes

    Ryujin 3.5

    A complex dragon design by Satoshi Kamiya that requires extensive folding and shaping to achieve its detailed appearance.
    • Creator: Satoshi Kamiya
    • Complexity: Extremely High
    • Sheets: One uncut square
    • Finished Size: Depends on the size of the starting paper
  2. 2
    32
    votes

    Ancient Dragon

    Another masterpiece by Satoshi Kamiya, this dragon is known for its intricate scales and three-dimensional structure.
    • Creator: Satoshi Kamiya
    • Complexity: Very High
    • Sheets: One uncut square
    • Finished Size: Varies
  3. 3
    1
    votes

    Black Devil Angler

    Designed by Robert J. Lang, this model is renowned for its complexity and the detailed representation of an angler fish.
    • Creator: Robert J. Lang
    • Complexity: Very High
    • Sheets: One uncut square
    • Finished Size: Varies
  4. 4
    1
    votes

    Cicada Nymph

    A highly detailed and realistic model created by Robert J. Lang, known for its intricate folds and lifelike appearance.
    • Creator: Robert J. Lang
    • Complexity: High
    • Sheets: One uncut square
    • Finished Size: Varies
  5. 5
    1
    votes

    Violinist

    A highly detailed human figure playing a violin, designed by Hojyo Takashi, known for its expressive posture and complexity.
    • Creator: Hojyo Takashi
    • Complexity: High
    • Sheets: One uncut square
    • Finished Size: Varies
  6. 6
    0
    votes

    Phoenix 3.5

    Another complex design by Satoshi Kamiya, the Phoenix 3.5 is admired for its detailed feathers and majestic appearance.
    • Creator: Satoshi Kamiya
    • Complexity: Very High
    • Sheets: One uncut square
    • Finished Size: Depends on the size of the starting paper
  7. 7
    0
    votes

    White Bison

    A model designed by Satoshi Kamiya that stands out for its realistic appearance and the challenge it presents in folding.
    • Creator: Satoshi Kamiya
    • Complexity: High
    • Sheets: One uncut square
    • Finished Size: Varies
  8. 8
    0
    votes

    Mantis Shrimp

    Designed by Brian Chan, this model is notable for its complexity and the detailed representation of a mantis shrimp.
    • Creator: Brian Chan
    • Complexity: High
    • Sheets: One uncut square
    • Finished Size: Varies
  9. 9
    0
    votes

    Blue Bar Pigeon

    A realistic bird model designed by Seth Friedman, known for its detailed plumage and lifelike stance.
    • Creator: Seth Friedman
    • Complexity: High
    • Sheets: One uncut square
    • Finished Size: Varies
  10. 10
    0
    votes

    Eagle Ray

    A complex model designed by Nguyen Ngoc Vu, known for its detailed and realistic representation of an eagle ray.
    • Creator: Nguyen Ngoc Vu
    • Complexity: High
    • Sheets: One uncut square
    • Finished Size: Varies

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About this ranking

This is a community-based ranking of the most difficult Origami. We do our best to provide fair voting, but it is not intended to be exhaustive. So if you notice something or Origami is missing, feel free to help improve the ranking!

Statistics

  • 5547 views
  • 179 votes
  • 10 ranked items

Voting Rules

A participant may cast an up or down vote for each Origami once every 24 hours. The rank of each Origami is then calculated from the weighted sum of all up and down votes.

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More about the Most Difficult Origami

Origami, the art of paper folding, has a rich history. It began in Japan over a thousand years ago. People often think of simple figures like cranes or boats. However, some origami designs are much more complex. These intricate forms challenge even skilled artists.

The process starts with a single sheet of paper. No cuts or glue are allowed. This rule makes the art even more impressive. The paper can be square or rectangular. The artist must plan each fold carefully. One mistake can ruin the entire piece. Precision is key.

Creating complex origami requires patience. It can take hours or even days to complete one piece. Artists often use diagrams or instructions. These guides show each step. Some steps involve hundreds of folds. Each fold must be exact. Even a small error can affect the final result.

Mathematics plays a big role in advanced origami. Artists use geometric principles to create their designs. They calculate angles and lengths. This math ensures each fold aligns correctly. Some artists even use computer software. These programs help design new models. They can simulate how the paper will fold.

Materials also matter. Traditional origami uses thin paper. Complex designs need stronger paper. This paper must withstand many folds. Some artists use special paper treated with chemicals. This makes it more durable. Others use foil-backed paper. This type holds its shape well.

Techniques vary among artists. Some prefer wet-folding. They dampen the paper before folding. This makes it more pliable. It also helps the paper hold curves. Others use modular origami. They create many small pieces. These pieces fit together to form a larger model. Each piece must be folded perfectly.

Complex origami often resembles objects from nature. Artists create lifelike animals, flowers, and insects. These models have many details. For example, a paper insect might have legs, antennae, and wings. Each part requires careful folding. The final piece looks almost real.

The community of origami artists is global. They share their work at conventions and online. Many artists teach workshops. They show others how to fold complex designs. This sharing of knowledge helps the art grow.

Origami has practical uses too. Engineers study it to solve real-world problems. They use origami principles to design foldable structures. These structures include space telescopes and medical devices. The art of paper folding inspires innovation.

Origami also has a meditative aspect. The process of folding can be calming. It requires focus and concentration. Many find it a form of relaxation. The slow, deliberate movements help clear the mind.

The most difficult origami designs push the limits of what is possible with paper. They showcase the skill and creativity of the artist. Each piece is a testament to patience, precision, and practice. The art of origami continues to evolve. New techniques and materials open up endless possibilities. The journey of folding paper into intricate forms is both challenging and rewarding.

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