The Most Popular Blood Type among Humans: Ranking the Preferred Choice

Choose the blood type among humans you think is the most popular!

Author: Gregor Krambs
Updated on Apr 21, 2024 06:51
Welcome to StrawPoll, where your opinion truly matters! Today, we're diving into the fascinating world of blood types and we need your help to determine the most popular blood type among humans. From the universal donor, O negative, to the rare AB positive, there's a whole spectrum of blood types that make us unique. So, roll up your sleeves and get ready to cast your vote or suggest a missing option in our exclusive ranking of the most popular blood types. Be part of this intriguing conversation and help us uncover the ultimate sanguine superstar! Don't miss out on this chance to contribute to our ever-growing community of passionate pollsters and curious minds. Cast your vote now and let the lifeblood of democracy flow!

What Is the Most Popular Blood Type among Humans?

  1. 1
    47
    votes
    O Positive
    Hyacinth · CC BY-SA 4.0

    O Positive

    Karl Landsteiner
    This blood type is the most common among all the blood types, with approximately 38% of the world's population having it. It is also considered a universal donor because it can be given to anyone regardless of their blood type.
    O Positive is a blood type that is widely recognized as one of the most common blood types among humans. It is known for being a universal donor, as it can be safely transfused to individuals of other blood types without causing adverse reactions. O Positive blood is characterized by the presence of both A and B antibodies, which makes it compatible with all Rh positive blood types. This blood type is also known for its versatility in emergency situations and its ability to be used in various medical procedures.
    • Antigens: Lacks A and B antigens
    • Antibodies: Contains both A and B antibodies
    • Compatibility: Compatible with all Rh positive blood types
    • Universal Donor: Can be transfused to individuals with other blood types
    • Emergency Use: Commonly used in emergency situations
  2. 2
    38
    votes

    A Positive

    Karl Landsteiner
    This blood type is the second most common, with around 34% of the world's population having it. It is more common in Europe and the Americas.
    A Positive is a type of blood that is characterized by the presence of the A antigen and the Rh factor. It is one of the most common blood types among humans.
    • Type: Blood type
    • Antigen: Presence of A antigen
    • Rh Factor: Presence of Rh factor
    • Compatibility: Can receive A or O type blood, and Rh positive or Rh negative blood
    • Prevalence: Around 34% of the worldwide population
  3. 3
    29
    votes

    B Positive

    Ludwig Hirszfeld
    This blood type is the third most common, with around 9% of the world's population having it. It is more common in Asia.
    B Positive is a specific blood type among humans that is characterized by the presence of B antigens and the Rhesus (Rh) factor. It is one of the eight main blood types recognized in the ABO blood grouping system.
    • Antigens: Presence of B antigens
    • Rh factor: Can be positive or negative
    • Compatibility: Compatible with B positive and AB positive blood types for blood transfusion
    • Genotype: B positive blood type can have the genotypes BB or Bb
    • Antibodies: Natural antibodies against A antigens
  4. 4
    20
    votes

    O Negative

    Dr. Karl Landsteiner
    This blood type is much rarer than O Positive, with only around 7% of the world's population having it. However, it is considered a universal donor because it can be given to anyone regardless of their blood type.
    O Negative is a blood type that is considered to be the universal donor, as it can be given to individuals of any blood type. It is a rare blood type, accounting for approximately 6.6% of the global population. Individuals with O Negative blood lack the A or B antigens on their red blood cells and do not have the Rh factor antigen. This blood type is compatible with O Negative, O Positive, A Negative, A Positive, B Negative, B Positive, AB Negative, and AB Positive blood types.
    • Compatibility: Compatible with all blood types
    • Population Percentage: Approximately 6.6% of the population
    • Antigen Presence: Lacks A or B antigens and Rh factor antigen
    • Universal Donor: Can be given to individuals of any blood type
    • Recipient Compatibility: Can receive blood from O Negative donors only
  5. 5
    13
    votes

    A Negative

    Karl Landsteiner
    This blood type is also relatively rare, with only around 6% of the world's population having it. It is more common in Europe and the Americas.
    A Negative is a blood type that is characterized by the absence of the A antigen and the presence of the Rh factor. It is one of the eight main blood types in the ABO system and considered relatively rare, with an estimated prevalence of around 1-2% of the global population.
    • Antigens: Absence of A antigen and presence of Rh factor
    • Compatibility: Can donate to A Negative and AB Negative, can receive from A Negative and O Negative
    • Prevalence: Approximately 1-2% of the global population
    • Inheritance: Can be inherited from parents with A or O blood types
    • Medical Considerations: May require careful transfusion matching and Rh(D) immune globulin during pregnancy
  6. 6
    6
    votes

    AB Positive

    Landsteiner and Weiner
    This blood type is relatively rare, with only around 3% of the world's population having it. It is more common in the Middle East.
    AB Positive is a blood type commonly found in humans, characterized by the presence of both A and B antigens on red blood cells, and the presence of Rh antigen. It is considered a rare blood type, accounting for only about 4% of the global population.
    • Antigens: A, B, Rh
    • Compatibility: Can receive blood from AB Positive, AB Negative, A Positive, A Negative, B Positive, B Negative, O Positive, O Negative
    • Blood Donations: Can donate blood to AB Positive, AB Negative
    • Blood Transfusions: Can receive blood from AB Positive, AB Negative, A Positive, A Negative, B Positive, B Negative, O Positive, O Negative
    • Universal Plasma Donor: AB Positive can donate plasma to any blood type
  7. 7
    16
    votes

    B Negative

    Karl Landsteiner
    This blood type is relatively rare, with only around 2% of the world's population having it. It is more common in Asia.
    B Negative is a type of blood group that belongs to the ABO blood group system. It is defined by the presence of B antigens on the surface of red blood cells and the absence of A antigens and Rh factor. Individuals with B Negative blood group can only donate blood to other people with B or AB blood types but can receive blood from individuals with B or O blood types. It is considered a relatively rare blood type.
    • Blood type system: ABO blood group system
    • Antigens present: B antigens
    • Antigens absent: A antigens, Rh factor
    • Compatible blood types for donation: B, AB
    • Compatible blood types for receiving: B, O
  8. 8
    5
    votes

    AB Negative

    Karl Landsteiner
    This blood type is the rarest of all, with only around 1% of the world's population having it. It is more common in the Middle East.
    AB Negative is a blood type that is found in a small percentage of the human population. It is considered to be the rarest blood type. Individuals with AB Negative blood have both A and B antigens on the surface of their red blood cells, but do not have the Rh factor antigen.
    • Antigens: A and B antigens
    • Rh Factor: Lacks the Rh factor antigen
    • Population Percentage: Approximately 0.6% of the population
    • Compatibility: Can receive blood from all blood types in case of emergencies (universal receiver)
    • Compatibility (Plasma): Can donate plasma to all blood types (universal plasma donor)
  9. 9
    10
    votes

    Rh Positive

    Karl Landsteiner
    Rh positive refers to the presence of the Rh factor on the surface of red blood cells. Approximately 85% of the world's population is Rh positive.
    Rh Positive is a blood type that is characterized by the presence of Rh factor on the surface of red blood cells. This type is the most common blood type among humans and can be further classified into different subtypes such as RhD positive, RhC positive, RhE positive, and others.
    • Discovery: Discovered in 1940 by Karl Landsteiner
    • Population: Approximately 85% of the human population is Rh Positive
    • Compatibility: Can receive blood transfusions from Rh Positive donors
    • Compatibility (RhD): RhD Positive individuals can receive blood transfusions from RhD Negative donors, but not vice versa
    • Antibody Production: Rh Positive individuals do not produce antibodies against Rh factor naturally
  10. 10
    6
    votes

    Rh Negative

    Karl Landsteiner
    Rh negative refers to the absence of the Rh factor on the surface of red blood cells. Approximately 15% of the world's population is Rh negative.
    Rh negative blood type is a rare blood type that lacks the Rh factor on the surface of red blood cells. It is found in a small percentage of the global population and is considered a distinct blood type.
    • Frequency: Rh negative blood type occurs in about 15% of the global population.
    • Antigen: Rh negative blood type lacks the Rh antigen on red blood cells.
    • Compatibility: Rh negative blood type can be safely transfused to individuals with both Rh positive and Rh negative blood types.
    • Transfusions: Rh negative individuals must receive Rh negative blood during transfusions to prevent adverse reactions.
    • Pregnancy: Rh negative women who conceive with an Rh positive partner may develop Rh incompatibility during pregnancy and require medical intervention to prevent complications.

Missing your favorite blood type among humans?

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Discussion

Ranking factors for popular blood type among humans

  1. Ethnicity and genetics
    Genetics and ethnic backgrounds play a crucial role in the distribution of blood types. Some blood types are more common among specific ethnicities and genetic lineages. For instance, blood type B is more prevalent in Asian populations.
  2. Population size
    In order to obtain an accurate ranking, it's important to consider the size of the population being studied. A larger sample size typically leads to more accurate results.
  3. Rh factor
    In addition to the ABO blood types (A, B, AB, and O), it's also important to consider the Rh factor. The Rh factor is either positive (present) or negative (absent), and can vary in frequency among different populations.
  4. Donor and recipient compatibility
    Popularity in blood donation and transfusion contexts depends on the demand for a specific blood type by hospitals and patients. For example, O negative is universally accepted as the "universal donor" and is in high demand, increasing its perceived popularity.

About this ranking

This is a community-based ranking of the most popular blood type among humans. We do our best to provide fair voting, but it is not intended to be exhaustive. So if you notice something or blood type is missing, feel free to help improve the ranking!

Statistics

  • 2109 views
  • 189 votes
  • 10 ranked items

Voting Rules

A participant may cast an up or down vote for each blood type once every 24 hours. The rank of each blood type is then calculated from the weighted sum of all up and down votes.

More information on most popular blood type among humans

Blood types are determined by the presence or absence of certain antigens on the surface of red blood cells. The most common blood type among humans is type O, with approximately 45% of the world's population having this blood type. Type A is the second most common, with around 40% of people having this blood type. Type B is less common, found in approximately 10% of individuals, while type AB is the rarest, present in less than 5% of the population. Knowing your blood type is important for medical purposes, as it can impact the success of blood transfusions and organ transplants.

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