The Most Popular Hummingbird, Ranked

Choose the Hummingbird you think is the most popular!

Author: Gregor Krambs
Updated on Jul 13, 2024 06:56
Hummingbirds, with their vibrant colors and rapid wing beats, capture the fascination of many. Yet, their small size and quick movements often make it a challenge for enthusiasts to observe and appreciate each species' unique qualities. A ranked list of the most popular hummingbirds can provide clarity and a better understanding of these creatures, helping observers know which species they might encounter or seek out in their natural habitats. By participating in ranking these exquisite birds, users contribute to a dynamic, community-sourced repository of preferences and popularity. This not only aids in educational and conservation efforts but also enhances the experience of bird watchers by highlighting which species are capturing the most interest. Each vote helps to refine the list, ensuring it remains a timely and accurate reflection of the most admired hummingbirds.

What Is the Most Popular Hummingbird?

  1. 1
    37
    points
    Ruby-throated Hummingbird

    Ruby-throated Hummingbird

    Known for its bright ruby-red throat and emerald green back, this species is prevalent across North America.
    • Scientific Name: Archilochus colubris
    • Size: 7-9 cm
    • Wingspan: 8-11 cm
    • Weight: 2-6 g
  2. 2
    34
    points
    Anna's Hummingbird

    Anna's Hummingbird

    A medium-sized hummingbird native to the west coast of North America, known for its iridescent emerald feathers and pink throat.
    • Scientific Name: Calypte anna
    • Size: 10 cm
    • Wingspan: 12 cm
    • Weight: 4-5 g
  3. 3
    33
    points
    Rufous Hummingbird

    Rufous Hummingbird

    This aggressive and territorial bird is known for its bright orange feathers and incredible long-distance migratory pattern.
    • Scientific Name: Selasphorus rufus
    • Size: 8-9 cm
    • Wingspan: 11 cm
    • Weight: 2-5 g
  4. 4
    18
    points
    Black-chinned Hummingbird

    Black-chinned Hummingbird

    This species is identifiable by its black, shimmering throat and is found in the western United States.
    • Scientific Name: Archilochus alexandri
    • Size: 8.5-10 cm
    • Wingspan: 11 cm
    • Weight: 3-4 g
  5. 5
    14
    points
    Costa's Hummingbird

    Costa's Hummingbird

    This small species is known for the male's vibrant purple cap and throat, found in the southwestern United States.
    • Scientific Name: Calypte costae
    • Size: 8-9 cm
    • Wingspan: 11 cm
    • Weight: 2-3 g
  6. 6
    13
    points
    Broad-tailed Hummingbird

    Broad-tailed Hummingbird

    Recognizable by its broad tail and brilliant colors, this hummingbird frequents the Rocky Mountain region.
    • Scientific Name: Selasphorus platycercus
    • Size: 9-10 cm
    • Wingspan: 12-14 cm
    • Weight: 3-4 g
  7. 7
    12
    points
    Calliope Hummingbird

    Calliope Hummingbird

    The smallest bird native to the United States and Canada, known for its striking magenta throat feathers.
    • Scientific Name: Selasphorus calliope
    • Size: 7-8 cm
    • Wingspan: 11 cm
    • Weight: 2-3 g
  8. 8
    9
    points
    Violet-crowned Hummingbird

    Violet-crowned Hummingbird

    Notable for its violet crown and white underparts, this hummingbird is primarily found in the southwestern United States and Mexico.
    • Scientific Name: Amazilia violiceps
    • Size: 10 cm
    • Wingspan: 12 cm
    • Weight: 4-5 g
  9. 9
    0
    points
    Blue-throated Mountain-gem

    Blue-throated Mountain-gem

    Larger than most North American hummingbirds, this species boasts a striking blue throat and is found in Central America and the southwestern US.
    • Scientific Name: Lampornis clemenciae
    • Size: 11-13 cm
    • Wingspan: 14 cm
    • Weight: 6-10 g
  10. 10
    0
    points
    Allen's Hummingbird

    Allen's Hummingbird

    Similar in appearance to the Rufous Hummingbird, Allen's Hummingbird is distinguished by its green back and flanks.
    • Scientific Name: Selasphorus sasin
    • Size: 9 cm
    • Wingspan: 11 cm
    • Weight: 3-4 g

Missing your favorite Hummingbird?

Graphs
Error: Failed to render graph
Discussion
No discussion started, be the first!

About this ranking

This is a community-based ranking of the most popular Hummingbird. We do our best to provide fair voting, but it is not intended to be exhaustive. So if you notice something or Hummingbird is missing, feel free to help improve the ranking!

Statistics

  • 1352 views
  • 170 votes
  • 10 ranked items

Movers & Shakers

Voting Rules

A participant may cast an up or down vote for each Hummingbird once every 24 hours. The rank of each Hummingbird is then calculated from the weighted sum of all up and down votes.

Additional Information

More about the Most Popular Hummingbird

Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Rank #1 for the most popular Hummingbird: Ruby-throated Hummingbird (Source)
Hummingbirds are small, colorful birds. They are known for their fast wings and ability to hover in place. These birds are native to the Americas, from Alaska to Tierra del Fuego. They thrive in diverse habitats, such as forests, gardens, and meadows.

Their vibrant feathers shine in the light, displaying a spectrum of colors. This iridescence comes from microscopic platelets in their feathers. These platelets reflect light in different ways, creating the bird's brilliant appearance.

Hummingbirds are the only birds that can fly backward. Their wings move in a unique figure-eight pattern, allowing them to hover and change direction swiftly. They beat their wings up to 80 times per second. This rapid movement creates a humming sound, which gives these birds their name.

These birds have a high metabolism. They need to eat often to maintain their energy levels. Their diet consists mainly of nectar from flowers. They also eat small insects and spiders for protein. Hummingbirds have long, specialized bills and tongues to reach deep into flowers and extract nectar.

To find food, they rely on their keen vision. They can see a broad range of colors, including ultraviolet light. This ability helps them locate flowers that other animals might miss. They also remember which flowers they have visited and how long it takes for those flowers to refill with nectar.

Hummingbirds are solitary creatures. They do not form flocks or migrate in groups. Each bird defends its feeding territory fiercely. They chase away intruders with aggressive displays and swift dives. Despite their small size, they are quite bold and fearless.

During the breeding season, males perform elaborate courtship displays. They show off their bright plumage and agility to attract females. After mating, the female builds a tiny nest. She uses plant fibers, spider silk, and other materials to create a secure home for her eggs. She lays one or two eggs and cares for the chicks alone.

Migration is a crucial part of their life cycle. Many species travel long distances between their breeding and wintering grounds. Some fly over vast stretches of water without stopping. They rely on stored fat reserves to fuel these journeys. This incredible feat showcases their endurance and navigational skills.

Conservation efforts are vital for protecting these birds. Habitat loss, climate change, and human activities threaten their populations. Planting native flowers and avoiding pesticides can help create safe environments for them. Supporting conservation programs and research also contributes to their survival.

In summary, hummingbirds are fascinating creatures with unique adaptations. Their vibrant colors, remarkable flight abilities, and high energy needs set them apart. These tiny birds play a significant role in pollination, benefiting many plants. By understanding and protecting them, we ensure that they continue to enchant and inspire us for generations to come.

Share this article