The Most Popular Shotgun in the U.S., Ranked

Choose the shotgun you think is the most popular!

Author: Gregor Krambs
Updated on May 28, 2024 07:13
Hunters and sports shooters often discuss which shotgun best fits their needs, whether for reliability, accuracy, or comfort. Such debates fuel a desire to see a ranked list reflecting the opinions and experiences of a broader audience. Gathering public votes assists in sculpting a clearer picture of user preferences and industry standards. By participating in this ranking, users contribute to a collective resource that benefits newcomers and enthusiasts alike seeking guidance on their next purchase. This democratic approach ensures the list stays current and reflective of real-world usage and satisfaction levels. Cast your vote to help others and to see how your preferred shotgun stacks up against the competition.

What Is the Most Popular Shotgun in the U.S.?

  1. 2
    37
    votes

    Mossberg 500

    A versatile pump-action shotgun with a variety of models for different purposes.
    • Type: Pump-action
    • Introduced: 1961
  2. 3
    9
    votes

    Stoeger M3500

    A budget-friendly semi-automatic shotgun popular among hunters for its versatility.
    • Type: Semi-automatic
    • Introduced: N/A
  3. 4
    6
    votes

    Beretta 686

    A popular over-under shotgun known for its balance and handling in sporting clays.
    • Type: Over-under
    • Introduced: N/A
  4. 5
    0
    votes

    Franchi SPAS-12

    A combat shotgun famous for its dual-mode action, allowing for both semi-automatic and pump-action operation.
    • Type: Semi-automatic/Pump-action
    • Introduced: 1979
  5. 6
    0
    votes

    Benelli M4

    A semi-automatic shotgun used by military and civilians alike, known for its reliability.
    • Type: Semi-automatic
    • Introduced: 1998
  6. 7
    0
    votes

    Winchester Model 12

    A historically significant pump-action shotgun known for its smooth action.
    • Type: Pump-action
    • Introduced: 1912
  7. 8
    0
    votes

    Ithaca Model 37

    A pump-action shotgun known for its featherlight design and bottom ejection.
    • Type: Pump-action
    • Introduced: 1937
  8. 9
    0
    votes

    Savage Stevens 320

    A budget pump-action shotgun known for its rugged reliability and affordability.
    • Type: Pump-action
    • Introduced: N/A
  9. 10
    0
    votes

    Browning BPS

    A reliable pump-action shotgun with a unique bottom ejection for ambidextrous use.
    • Type: Pump-action
    • Introduced: 1977

Missing your favorite shotgun?

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About this ranking

This is a community-based ranking of the most popular shotgun in the U.S.. We do our best to provide fair voting, but it is not intended to be exhaustive. So if you notice something or shotgun is missing, feel free to help improve the ranking!

Statistics

  • 3474 views
  • 94 votes
  • 10 ranked items

Voting Rules

A participant may cast an up or down vote for each shotgun once every 24 hours. The rank of each shotgun is then calculated from the weighted sum of all up and down votes.

Additional Information

More about the Most Popular Shotgun in the U.S.

Remington 870
Rank #1 for the most popular shotgun in the U.S.: Remington 870 (Source)
Shotguns hold a special place in American culture. They serve many purposes, from hunting to home defense. Their versatility makes them a popular choice among firearm enthusiasts. Understanding their appeal requires a look at their history, features, and uses.

Shotguns have been around for centuries. Early models were simple and crude. Over time, they evolved. Modern shotguns are reliable and efficient. They provide a balance of power and precision. This evolution reflects advances in technology and changing needs of users.

A key feature of shotguns is their ability to fire multiple projectiles with one pull of the trigger. These projectiles, called pellets, spread out after leaving the barrel. This spread increases the chance of hitting a target. It makes shotguns effective for moving targets, like birds or clay pigeons. The spread also makes them suitable for home defense. Aiming is less critical, which can be crucial in high-stress situations.

Shotguns come in different types. The most common are pump-action, semi-automatic, and break-action. Pump-action shotguns require the user to manually cycle the action. This involves pulling a fore-end back and then pushing it forward. Each cycle loads a new shell into the chamber. Semi-automatic shotguns, on the other hand, use gas or recoil to cycle the action. This allows for faster follow-up shots. Break-action shotguns are the simplest. The user opens the barrel, loads a shell, and closes it. They are often used for sport shooting.

The choice of ammunition also affects the shotgun's performance. Shotguns can fire different types of shells. Birdshot contains many small pellets. It is ideal for hunting small game. Buckshot has fewer, larger pellets. It is often used for hunting larger game and for home defense. Slugs are single, large projectiles. They provide higher accuracy at longer ranges. This variety of ammunition adds to the shotgun's versatility.

Training and practice are important for shotgun users. Proper handling and safety measures are crucial. Shotguns have a strong recoil, which can surprise new users. Learning to manage this recoil improves accuracy and control. Regular practice helps users become proficient and confident.

Shotguns also have a strong presence in popular culture. They appear in movies, TV shows, and video games. This visibility reinforces their iconic status. It also introduces them to new audiences. However, it is important to distinguish between fiction and reality. Responsible ownership and use are essential.

The popularity of shotguns in the U.S. is due to their versatility, reliability, and cultural significance. They serve a wide range of purposes and appeal to many types of users. From hunting to home defense, shotguns offer a practical and effective option. Their design and function continue to evolve, meeting the needs of each new generation of users. Whether for sport, protection, or tradition, shotguns remain a staple in American life.

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