The Most Advanced Martial Art, Ranked

Choose the martial art you think is the most advanced!

Author: Gregor Krambs
Updated on Jul 18, 2024 06:17
Martial arts enthusiasts often debate which discipline is the most advanced, citing various techniques and philosophies unique to each style. A consolidated ranking that reflects a broad collective view can help clarify these discussions, providing insights based on a wider array of experiences and preferences. This engages the community to share their knowledge and expertise on a diverse array of martial arts. By participating in this ranking, users contribute to a global understanding of martial arts, seeing which styles resonate most with practitioners around the world. Each vote can potentially shift the balance, offering a dynamic perspective on the merits of different martial arts. This process not only informs new learners but also deepens the appreciation for seasoned martial artists.

What Is the Most Advanced Martial Art?

  1. 1
    30
    points
    Krav Maga

    Krav Maga

    A military self-defense and fighting system developed for the Israel Defense Forces and Israeli security forces.
    • Origin: Israel; Mid-20th century
    • Focus: Self-defense, hand-to-hand combat
  2. 2
    24
    points
    Muay Thai

    Muay Thai

    A combat sport of Thailand that uses stand-up striking along with various clinching techniques.
    • Origin: Thailand; 18th century
    • Focus: Striking, clinching
  3. 3
    16
    points
    Wing Chun

    Wing Chun

    A traditional Southern Chinese Kung fu (wushu) style and a form of self-defense, which requires quick arm movements and strong legs to defeat opponents.
    • Origin: China; 18th century
    • Focus: Striking, trapping
  4. 4
    14
    points
    Taekwondo

    Taekwondo

    A Korean martial art, characterized by its emphasis on head-height kicks, jumping and spinning kicks, and fast kicking techniques.
    • Origin: Korea; 1940s
    • Focus: Striking, kicking
  5. 5
    3
    points
    Judo

    Judo

    A modern martial art, combat and Olympic sport created in Japan in 1882 by Jigoro Kano. Its most prominent feature is its competitive element, where the objective is to either throw or takedown an opponent to the ground.
    • Origin: Japan; 1882
    • Focus: Grappling
  6. 6
    1
    points
    Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ)

    Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ)

    A martial art and combat sport system that focuses on grappling and especially ground fighting.
    • Origin: Brazil; Early 20th century
    • Focus: Ground fighting, submission holds
  7. 7
    1
    points
    Karate

    Karate

    A martial art developed in the Ryukyu Kingdom. It developed from the indigenous Ryukyuan martial arts under the influence of Chinese Kung Fu, particularly Fujian White Crane.
    • Origin: Ryukyu Kingdom (now Okinawa, Japan); 17th century
    • Focus: Striking
  8. 8
    1
    points
    Mixed Martial Arts (MMA)

    Mixed Martial Arts (MMA)

    A full-contact combat sport that allows a wide variety of fighting techniques and skills from a mixture of other combat sports to be used in competition.
    • Origin: Global; Modern era
    • Focus: Integrating various combat sports and martial arts
  9. 9
    0
    points
    Kendo

    Kendo

    A traditional Japanese martial art, which descended from swordsmanship (kenjutsu) and uses bamboo swords (shinai) and protective armor (bōgu).
    • Origin: Japan; 18th century
    • Focus: Swordsmanship
  10. 10
    0
    points
    Aikido

    Aikido

    A modern Japanese martial art developed by Morihei Ueshiba as a synthesis of his martial studies, philosophy, and religious beliefs. Aikido is often translated as 'the way of unifying (with) life energy' or as 'the way of harmonious spirit.'
    • Origin: Japan; Early 20th century
    • Focus: Throwing, joint locks, strikes, and pinning techniques

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About this ranking

This is a community-based ranking of the most advanced martial art. We do our best to provide fair voting, but it is not intended to be exhaustive. So if you notice something or martial art is missing, feel free to help improve the ranking!

Statistics

  • 1680 views
  • 87 votes
  • 10 ranked items

Movers & Shakers

Voting Rules

A participant may cast an up or down vote for each martial art once every 24 hours. The rank of each martial art is then calculated from the weighted sum of all up and down votes.

Additional Information

More about the Most Advanced Martial Art

Krav Maga
Rank #1 for the most advanced martial art: Krav Maga (Source)
Martial arts have evolved over centuries. They blend physical skill, mental discipline, and cultural traditions. The most advanced form of martial arts stands out due to its complexity and effectiveness. This art requires years of training and dedication.

The roots of this martial art trace back to ancient times. Warriors developed techniques to defend themselves and their communities. Over time, these techniques became more refined. Practitioners learned to use their bodies in precise ways. They studied movements, strikes, and defensive tactics.

Training in this martial art starts with basic movements. Students learn to control their bodies. They practice stances, footwork, and simple strikes. Each movement has a purpose. Every action is deliberate. As students progress, they learn more complex techniques. These include throws, joint locks, and pressure point strikes.

Mental discipline is key. Practitioners must stay focused. They need to clear their minds of distractions. Meditation and breathing exercises help. These practices develop inner strength. They also improve concentration and reaction time.

Sparring is an important part of training. It allows students to test their skills. They face opponents in controlled settings. This helps them understand timing and distance. They learn to anticipate their opponent’s moves. Sparring also builds confidence.

Instructors play a crucial role. They guide students through their training. They provide feedback and encouragement. They also ensure that students practice safely. Injuries are rare but can happen. Proper technique reduces the risk.

This martial art is not just about fighting. It teaches respect and humility. Practitioners bow to their instructors and peers. They follow a code of conduct. They strive to improve themselves, both physically and mentally.

Competitions are part of this martial art. They allow practitioners to showcase their skills. Competitors face off in matches. Judges score based on technique, control, and effectiveness. Winning requires more than physical ability. It demands strategy and mental toughness.

The most advanced martial art continues to evolve. Modern practitioners incorporate new techniques. They study other martial arts and adapt useful elements. This keeps the art relevant and effective.

Despite its complexity, this martial art is accessible. People of all ages and backgrounds can train. It offers many benefits. Physical fitness improves. Mental clarity increases. Confidence grows. Practitioners often form strong bonds with their peers. The training environment fosters a sense of community.

The most advanced martial art is a journey. It challenges the body and mind. It requires dedication and perseverance. Those who commit to it find it rewarding. They gain skills that extend beyond the training hall. They learn to face challenges with resilience and grace.

This martial art is a testament to human potential. It shows what can be achieved through hard work and discipline. It honors tradition while embracing innovation. It is a path to personal growth and self-discovery.

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