The Most Popular Dessert in Germany, Ranked

Choose the dessert you think is the most popular!

Author: Gregor Krambs
Updated on Jul 17, 2024 06:47
Choosing the right dessert in Germany can be a delightful yet daunting task, given the rich culinary heritage and the variety of sweet treats on offer. By establishing a live ranking of the most favored desserts, both locals and tourists gain a trustworthy guide to what might suit their sweet cravings the best. This dynamic list is shaped by the votes and preferences of a broad community of dessert lovers, ensuring the rankings reflect current tastes and trends. Participating in this voting process not only guides others to make enjoyable dessert choices but also gives individuals a voice in a larger culinary conversation. Every vote contributes to a clearer picture of dessert popularity, providing valuable insights into regional preferences and seasonal variations. Encouraging active participation helps ensure the ranking remains relevant and up-to-date, offering a reliable resource for anyone looking to indulge in Germany’s favorite desserts.

What Is the Most Popular Dessert in Germany?

  1. 1
    70
    points
    Black Forest Cake

    Black Forest Cake

    A rich, layered cake made with chocolate sponge cake, whipped cream, and cherries.
    • Origin: Black Forest region, Germany
    • Main Ingredients: Chocolate sponge cake, whipped cream, cherries
  2. 2
    54
    points
    Apple Strudel

    Apple Strudel

    A traditional Viennese strudel, a popular pastry in Germany with a filling of tart cooking apples.
    • Origin: Austria, popular in Germany
    • Main Ingredients: Apples, pastry dough
  3. 3
    22
    points
    Rote Grütze

    Rote Grütze

    A sweet red berry dessert from Northern Germany made from a mixture of various berries, such as raspberries, strawberries, and blackberries, thickened with cornstarch or sago.
    • Origin: Northern Germany
    • Main Ingredients: Berries, cornstarch or sago
  4. 4
    18
    points
    Stollen

    Stollen

    A fruit bread of nuts, spices, and dried or candied fruit, coated with powdered sugar or icing sugar. It is a traditional German bread eaten during the Christmas season.
    • Origin: Germany
    • Season: Christmas
  5. 5
    13
    points
    Kaiserschmarrn

    Kaiserschmarrn

    A shredded pancake that has its name from the Austrian emperor (Kaiser) Franz Joseph I, who was very fond of this kind of fluffy shredded pancake.
    • Origin: Austria, popular in Germany
    • Main Ingredients: Flour, eggs, sugar, milk
  6. 6
    0
    points
    Bee Sting Cake

    Bee Sting Cake

    A traditional German dessert consisting of a sweet yeast dough with a baked-on topping of caramelized almonds, filled with a vanilla custard, cream or buttercream.
    • Origin: Germany
    • Main Ingredients: Yeast dough, almonds, custard
  7. 7
    0
    points
    Sacher Torte

    Sacher Torte

    A type of chocolate cake, or torte, invented by Austrian Franz Sacher in 1832 for Prince Wenzel von Metternich in Vienna, Austria. It is one of the most famous Viennese culinary specialties.
    • Origin: Vienna, Austria, popular in Germany
    • Main Ingredients: Chocolate, apricot jam
  8. 8
    0
    points
    German Cheesecake

    German Cheesecake

    A variation of cheesecake using Quark as a main ingredient, making it lighter than its American counterpart.
    • Origin: Germany
    • Main Ingredients: Quark, eggs, sugar, crust
  9. 9
    0
    points
    Marzipan

    Marzipan

    A confection consisting primarily of sugar or honey and almond meal, sometimes augmented with almond oil or extract. It is often made into sweets; common uses include chocolate-covered marzipan and small marzipan imitations of fruits and vegetables.
    • Origin: Persia, popular in Germany
    • Main Ingredients: Almond meal, sugar or honey
  10. 10
    0
    points

    Pflaumenkuchen

    A plum cake or tart made with yeast dough or short pastry covered with a layer of plums. It is a traditional German dessert, especially popular in late summer.
    • Origin: Germany
    • Season: Late summer

Missing your favorite dessert?

Graphs
Error: Failed to render graph
Discussion
No discussion started, be the first!

About this ranking

This is a community-based ranking of the most popular dessert in Germany. We do our best to provide fair voting, but it is not intended to be exhaustive. So if you notice something or Dessert is missing, feel free to help improve the ranking!

Statistics

  • 2233 views
  • 177 votes
  • 10 ranked items

Movers & Shakers

Voting Rules

A participant may cast an up or down vote for each Dessert once every 24 hours. The rank of each Dessert is then calculated from the weighted sum of all up and down votes.

Additional Information

More about the Most Popular Dessert in Germany

Black Forest Cake
Rank #1 for the most popular dessert in Germany: Black Forest Cake (Source)
Germany has a rich culinary history, and its desserts are no exception. German desserts reflect the country's diverse regions and cultural influences. Over the centuries, these sweet treats have evolved, incorporating local ingredients and traditions. Many desserts are tied to specific festivals and holidays, making them an integral part of German life.

German desserts often use ingredients like flour, butter, sugar, and eggs. Nuts, fruits, and spices also play a key role. These components come together in a variety of ways, creating unique textures and flavors. The use of seasonal fruits is common, with apples, cherries, and plums being favorites. Nuts like almonds and hazelnuts add a crunchy element to many recipes.

The preparation methods for German desserts range from simple to complex. Some involve baking, while others require frying or boiling. Many desserts are made from scratch, ensuring a homemade touch. The process can be time-consuming, but the results are worth the effort. The aroma of freshly baked goods often fills German homes, especially during the colder months.

German desserts are not just about taste; they also have a visual appeal. Presentation matters, with many desserts featuring intricate designs or decorations. Powdered sugar, icing, and glazes add a finishing touch. Some desserts are layered, creating a beautiful cross-section when sliced. Others are rolled or shaped into specific forms, adding to their charm.

Family recipes play a significant role in the world of German desserts. These recipes are passed down through generations, preserving the culinary heritage. Each family might have its own version of a popular dessert, adding a personal twist. This tradition ensures that the diversity of German desserts continues to grow.

Festivals and holidays are prime times for enjoying these sweet treats. Christmas, in particular, is a season when many special desserts are made. These holiday desserts often have symbolic meanings or historical significance. They bring families together, creating memories and traditions that last a lifetime.

German desserts have also gained international recognition. Many people around the world enjoy these treats, either by making them at home or buying them from bakeries. The global popularity of German desserts highlights their universal appeal. They offer a taste of German culture, no matter where you are.

In recent years, there has been a trend towards modernizing traditional recipes. Chefs and home cooks alike experiment with new ingredients and techniques. This fusion of old and new keeps the world of German desserts exciting and dynamic. While the classics remain beloved, there is always room for innovation.

German desserts are a testament to the country's rich culinary tradition. They bring joy to everyday life and special occasions alike. Whether enjoyed with a cup of coffee or as the grand finale to a meal, these sweet treats are a true delight. The combination of quality ingredients, careful preparation, and artistic presentation makes German desserts a cherished part of the country's culture.

Share this article