The Most Popular Food in New Hampshire, Ranked

Choose the food you think is the most popular!

Author: Gregor Krambs
Updated on May 24, 2024 09:08
When people journey through New Hampshire, they are often curious about the local cuisine. Establishing a ranked list of popular foods can guide visitors and residents alike by highlighting what many consider the top choices. This not only enriches their dining experience but also supports local businesses by directing attention to their standout dishes. By participating in the ranking process, users provide invaluable insights that refine the list to better reflect current preferences. This dynamic ranking evolves with each vote, ensuring that newer or less-known dishes have the chance to shine. Such a list becomes a reliable resource for anyone looking to enjoy some of New Hampshire's most celebrated foods.

What Is the Most Popular Food in New Hampshire?

  1. 2
    21
    votes

    Apple Cider Donuts

    A popular fall treat in New Hampshire, these donuts are made with apple cider and often coated in cinnamon sugar.
    • Origin: United States
  2. 3
    15
    votes

    Fried Clams

    A popular seafood dish in New Hampshire, fried clams are often served with tartar sauce.
    • Main Ingredient: Clams
  3. 4
    14
    votes

    Clam Chowder

    New England clam chowder, creamy and hearty, is a staple in New Hampshire's cuisine.
    • Key Ingredient: Clams
  4. 5
    0
    votes

    American Chop Suey

    A comfort food classic in New Hampshire, this dish consists of elbow macaroni, ground beef, and a tomato-based sauce.
    • Other Names: Goulash, Johnny Marzetti
  5. 7
    0
    votes

    Boiled Dinner

    A traditional New England dish, boiled dinner includes corned beef, potatoes, carrots, and cabbage, all boiled together.
    • Typical Ingredients: Corned beef, potatoes, carrots, cabbage
  6. 8
    0
    votes

    Whoopie Pies

    These sweet treats, made of two soft cookies with a creamy filling, are a beloved snack across New Hampshire.
    • Main Ingredients: Flour, sugar, eggs, butter, milk
  7. 9
    0
    votes

    Pumpkin Pie

    Given New Hampshire's robust pumpkin harvest, pumpkin pie is a common and beloved dessert, especially during the fall.
    • Main Ingredient: Pumpkin
  8. 10
    0
    votes

    Lobster Roll

    Although more commonly associated with Maine, lobster rolls are also a favorite in New Hampshire, especially along the coast.
    • Main Ingredient: Lobster meat

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About this ranking

This is a community-based ranking of the most popular food in New Hampshire. We do our best to provide fair voting, but it is not intended to be exhaustive. So if you notice something or food is missing, feel free to help improve the ranking!

Statistics

  • 1422 views
  • 75 votes
  • 10 ranked items

Voting Rules

A participant may cast an up or down vote for each food once every 24 hours. The rank of each food is then calculated from the weighted sum of all up and down votes.

Additional Information

More about the Most Popular Food in New Hampshire

Maple Syrup
Rank #1 for the most popular food in New Hampshire: Maple Syrup (Source)
New Hampshire, a state in New England, has a rich culinary history. The food here reflects its geography, history, and culture. The cuisine combines influences from early settlers, local resources, and seasonal changes.

The state's proximity to the Atlantic Ocean shapes its food traditions. Fresh seafood plays a big role in local diets. Coastal towns rely on the ocean for their main ingredients. Inland, lakes and rivers provide other fresh catches. These waters offer a bounty that locals cherish.

Forests cover much of New Hampshire. They provide wild game and foraged goods. Hunters and gatherers collect these ingredients with care. The woods yield mushrooms, berries, and nuts. These finds add depth to the region's dishes.

The state's history with farming also influences its food. Early settlers brought farming techniques from Europe. They grew crops that could survive harsh winters. Today, farms still produce these hardy crops. Farmers' markets and roadside stands sell fresh produce. Locals and visitors enjoy this farm-to-table experience.

New Hampshire experiences four distinct seasons. Each season brings different foods to the table. Winter meals are hearty and warm. Spring introduces fresh greens and lighter fare. Summer offers a burst of fruits and vegetables. Fall brings a harvest of root vegetables and squash. Seasonal eating is a way of life here.

The state also has a tradition of preserving food. Long winters meant people needed to store food. Canning, pickling, and smoking were common methods. These techniques are still used today. They connect modern cooks with their ancestors.

Local festivals celebrate the state's food heritage. These events highlight seasonal and regional specialties. They bring communities together to share and enjoy. Food plays a central role in these gatherings.

The influence of neighboring states is also evident. New Hampshire shares borders with Maine, Vermont, and Massachusetts. Each of these states has its own food traditions. These influences blend with local practices. The result is a diverse and unique culinary landscape.

New Hampshire's food scene continues to evolve. New chefs bring fresh ideas and techniques. They respect tradition while embracing innovation. Restaurants offer a mix of old and new. Diners can enjoy classic dishes or try something modern.

Local ingredients remain at the heart of the cuisine. Chefs and home cooks alike value fresh, regional produce. They build their menus around what is available. This practice keeps the food vibrant and connected to the land.

New Hampshire's food culture is a reflection of its people. It is built on tradition, shaped by the seasons, and influenced by the region. The cuisine tells the story of the state. It connects the past with the present and looks to the future. The food of New Hampshire is a celebration of its heritage and a testament to its resilience.

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